esoteric iconography of Japanese maṇḍalas
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esoteric iconography of Japanese maṇḍalas

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Published by International Academy of Indian Culture and Aditya Prakashan in New Delhi .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Japan

Subjects:

  • Gods, Buddhist -- Japan -- Pictorial works,
  • Gods, Buddhist, in art -- Pictorical works,
  • Buddhist art and symbolism -- Japan -- Pictorial works,
  • Mandala (Buddhism) -- Japan -- Pictorial works

Book details:

About the Edition

Reproduction of a set of xylographic prints illustrating the Buddhist deities of the Mahākaruṇāgarbha and Vajradhātu tantras; chiefly pictorial works.

Edition Notes

Other titlesMahākaruṇāgarbhatantra., Vajradhātutantra.
StatementLokesh Chandra.
GenrePictorial works., Pictorical works.
SeriesŚata-piṭaka series ;, v. 607
ContributionsInternational Academy of Indian Culture.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBQ4630 .L574 2003
The Physical Object
Pagination369 p. :
Number of Pages369
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3709301M
LC Control Number2003305946

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The Esoteric Iconography Of Japanese Mandalas: A Concise Encyclopaedia of Early Buddhist Philosophy: Astro-Wisdom: The Knowledge, Love and Power in Your Stars: Dakshinmurthy Stotram: Adhyatma Ramayana: The Chinese Way to Health: The Yoga of Jesus: Understanding the Hidden Teachings of the Gospels: A Textbook of Kayachikitsa (3 Volumes) Who is this Shama Churn? --List of ritual texts and figures of esoteric Buddhism in Japan contained in the icoconographic section of the Taishō edition of the Chinese Buddhist Tripiṭaka, by C. . Get this from a library! The esoteric iconography of Japanese maṇḍalas. [Lokesh Chandra.; International Academy of Indian Culture.] -- Reproduction of a set of xylographic prints illustrating the Buddhist deities of the Mahākaruṇāgarbha and Vajradhātu tantras; chiefly pictorial works. Shingon Buddhism -- esoteric Buddhism brought to Japan from China during the early ninth century -- inspired a new spiritual energy that found expression in varied forms, especially in art and iconography.5/5(5).

, The esoteric iconography of Japanese maṇḍalas / Lokesh Chandra International Academy of Indian Culture and Aditya Prakashan New Delhi Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. The book "The Esoteric Iconography of Japanese Mandalas " is written by Lokesh Chandra. This book was published in the year This book was published in the year The ISBN number X| is assigned to the Hardback version of this title. She is the author of Icons and Iconoclasm in Japanese Buddhism: Kūkai and Dōgen on the Art of Enlightenment (Oxford University Press, ), which won the Book Prize from the Association of Asian Studies—Southeast Conference. Her second book is a co-edited volume on Zen and Material Culture with Steven Heine (Oxford University Press, ). The Shamanic and Esoteric Origins of the Japanese Martial Arts Author: Roald Knutsen This fully illustrated volume, including an eight-page colour-plate section, is the first in-depth study in English to examine the warrior and shamanic characteristics and significance of tengu in the martial art culture (bugei) of Muromachi Japan ().Cited by: 1.

This book does not so much deal with iconography of Buddha as with the interpretation of a few basic symbols of Buddhist art, viz., the fiery pillar, the tree, the trisula or tri-ratna, the lotus and the wheel. Mudras or postures of the hands have been central to the iconography and ritual of the esoteric Mantray?na and Vajrayana denominations of the earliest illustrated manual of mudr?s goes back to the great master? ubhakarasi ha who lived from to As early as AD ,a mudra-manual entitled Shi-n-zu, appeared in the Tendai denomination in accordance with the tradition of . Book Description: The first broad study of Japanese mandalas to appear in a Western language, this volume interprets mandalas as sanctified realms where . In Japan, the kesa standard for Esoteric Buddhist rituals consists of a bordered patchwork with seven columns (jō), the short and long pieces within them set in a framework of vertical and horizontal strips (yō). A square patch occurs in each corner, and, commonly, a pair of larger patches flanks the central column.